Archive for radioactive

Radiation levels inside a stricken reactor at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant have hit a record high capable of shutting down robots within 2 hours!!

Posted in 2017 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 3, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

nuclear_fukushima

Radiation levels inside a stricken reactor at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant have hit a record high capable of shutting down robots, in the latest challenge to efforts aimed at dismantling the disaster-hit facility.

Radiation levels inside the plant’s No. 2 reactor were estimated at 530 sieverts per hour at one spot, Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) said Thursday after analyzing images taken by a manually operated camera that probed the deepest point yet within the reactor.

Even after taking a 30-percent margin of error into account, the radiation level was still far higher than the previous record of 73 sieverts per hour detected by sensors in 2012 though at a point not as deep, TEPCO said. Radiation exposure at 530 sieverts per hour would effectively shut down TEPCO’s planned robot camera probe in under two hours.

But TEPCO said the high reading focused on a single point, with levels estimated to be much lower at other spots filmed by the camera. It added that the planned robot probe would not sustain severe damage because it was unlikely to linger for too long at a single point.

The three cameras mounted on a caterpillar-type robot are designed to withstand up to 1,000 sieverts in total. TEPCO said the radiation is not leaking outside the reactor. A massive undersea earthquake on March 11, 2011 sent a huge tsunami barrelling into Japan’s northeast coast, leaving more than 18,000 people dead or missing, and sending three reactors into meltdown at the Fukushima plant in the worst such accident since Chernobyl in 1986.

Japan’s government said in December that it expects the total costs – including compensation, decommissioning and decontamination – to reach 21.5 trillion yen ($190 billion) in a process likely to take decades as high radiation levels have slowed operations.

TEPCO has said it plans to eventually use robots to locate the fuel debris as part of the decommissioning process.

Images of the wreckage inside the No. 2 reactor captured by the camera show that the metal grating under the pressure vessel which contained nuclear fuel has largely sunken in, causing a hole about one metre wide.

Black debris that could be melted fuel is also seen in the images. Fuel may have melted through the vessel and damaged the grating but the exact cause was not determined, TEPCO spokesman Tatsuhiro Yamagishi said Friday. “It may have been caused by nuclear fuel that would have melted and made a hole in the vessel, but it is only a hypothesis at this stage,” he told AFP.

“We believe the captured images offer very useful information, but we still need to investigate given that it is very difficult to assume the actual condition inside,” he said.

Source:

http://hisz.rsoe.hu/

The Secret Ingredients of Everything From smart phones to hybrid vehicles to cordless power drills,

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 23, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

rare-earth-samarium-615

Photograph by Nick Mann

 

Devices we all desire are made with a pinch of rare earths—exotic elements that right now come mostly from China.

Most of us would be hard-pressed to locate Inner Mongolia, Jiangxi, or Guangdong on a map. Yet many of the high-tech devices we depend on—cell phones, laptops, and hundreds of others—would not exist without an obscure group of elements mined, sometimes illegally, in those three and other regions of China.

Rare earths, as the elements are called, were discovered beginning in the late 18th century as oxidized minerals—hence “earths.” They’re actually metals, and they aren’t really rare; they’re just scattered. A handful of dirt from your backyard would probably contain a smidgen, maybe a few parts per million. The rarest rare earth is nearly 200 times more abundant than gold. But deposits large and concentrated enough to be worth mining are indeed rare.

The list of things that contain rare earths is almost endless. Magnets made with them are much more powerful than conventional magnets and weigh less; that’s one reason so many electronic devices have gotten so small. Rare earths are also essential to a host of green machines, including hybrid cars and wind turbines. The battery in a single Toyota Prius contains more than 20 pounds of the rare earth element lanthanum; the magnet in a large wind turbine may contain 500 pounds or more of neodymium. The U.S. military needs rare earths for night-vision goggles, cruise missiles, and other weapons.

“They’re all around you,” says Karl Gschneidner, a senior metallurgist with the Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, who has studied rare earth elements for more than 50 years. “The phosphors in your TV—the red color comes from an element called europium. The catalytic converter on your exhaust system contains cerium and lanthanum. They’re hidden unless you know about them, so most people never worried about them as long as they could keep buying them.”

Now a lot of people are worried.

China, which supplies 97 percent of the world’s rare earth needs, rattled global markets in the fall of 2010 when it cut off shipments to Japan for a month during a diplomatic dispute. Over the next decade China is expected to steadily reduce rare earth exports in order to protect the supplies of its own rapidly growing industries, which already consume about 60 percent of the rare earths produced in the country.

Fears of future shortages have sent prices soaring. Dysprosium, used in computer hard drives, now sells for $212 a pound, up from $6.77 eight years ago. Over just two months last summer, prices on cerium jumped more than 450 percent. World demand will probably exceed supply before the end of 2011, says Mark A. Smith, president and CEO of Molycorp, an American company that reopened a rare earth mine at Mountain Pass, California, last year.

“We’re in a supply crunch right now, and it’s a pretty severe one,” says Smith. “This year the demand will be 55,000 to 60,000 tons outside of China, and everyone’s best guess right now is that China will be exporting about 24,000 tons of material. We’ll survive because of industry inventories and government stockpiles, but I think 2011 will be a very, very critical year in terms of supply and demand.”

TO BE CONTINUED ON

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/06/rare-earth-elements/folger-text/2

CONTINUE »

Radioactive Wolves Of Chernobyl – Scary Mutations

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , on March 15, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

An amazing documentary on the radioactive Wolves of Chernobyl.
THE BIGGEST SECRET OF THE INTERNET:
http://www.biggest-secrets.com

Imagine Dragons – Radioactive

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , , , , on February 7, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa

I’m waking up to ash and dust
I wipe my brow and I sweat my rust
I’m breathing in the chemicals

I’m breaking in, shaping up, then checking out on the prison bus
This is it, the apocalypse
Whoa

I’m waking up, I feel it in my bones
Enough to make my systems blow
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I’m radioactive, radioactive
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I’m radioactive, radioactive

I raise my flags, don my clothes
It’s a revolution, I suppose
We’ll paint it red to fit right in
Whoa

I’m breaking in, shaping up, then checking out on the prison bus
This is it, the apocalypse
Whoa

I’m waking up, I feel it in my bones
Enough to make my systems blow
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I’m radioactive, radioactive
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I’m radioactive, radioactive

All systems go, the sun hasn’t died
Deep in my bones, straight from inside

I’m waking up, I feel it in my bones
Enough to make my systems blow
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I’m radioactive, radioactive
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I’m radioactive, radioactive

Don’t think the radiation from the Fukushima Nuclear Plant in Japan won’t reach the U.S.? Check Out the Radioactive Cloud/Fallout Over Europe From the Chernobyl Disaster

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on March 17, 2011 by theboldcorsicanflame

Beyond Nuclear Staff Tracking Nuclear Plant Crisis in Japan Quake Zone

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 11, 2011 by theboldcorsicanflame


READ FULL ARTICLE ON
http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/latest-national/22468-beyond-nuclear-staff-tracking-nuclear-plant-crisis-in-japan-quake-zone.html

EXCERPT
TAKOMA PARK, MD–(ENEWSPF)–March 11 – Beyond Nuclear staff members are closely monitoring the unfolding nuclear power plant crisis in Japan following a massive earthquake and are available to provide technical expertise and information to media today and tonight.

Mixed reports about the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant confirm that emergency battery power is being used to keep the plant’s emergency core cooling systems running. A mass evacuation suggests the possibility that radioactivity is being – or could be – released from the plant.

Eleven of Japan’s 55 reactors are reportedly shut down due to the earthquake and as many as 6,000 residents are already being evacuated around the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

“The emergency at Fukushima Daiichi is alarming because the plant has lost central and emergency diesel power to most of its safety systems and is relying on battery power which can deplete in a matter of hours,” said Paul Gunter, director of the Reactor Oversight Project at Beyond Nuclear who has traveled in Japan and is familiar with their nuclear complex. “Once the batteries give out, the irradiated nuclear fuel in the operating reactor core could begin to melt down. If the containment systems fail, a catastrophic radioactivity release to the environment could occur. This particular containment system is already notorious for being a weak design likely to fail.”

Added Kevin Kamps, Radioactive Waste Watchdog at Beyond Nuclear who was recently on a nuclear power-related speaking tour in Japan: “In addition to the reactor cores, the storage pool for highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel is also at risk. The pool cooling water must be continuously circulated. Without circulation, the still thermally hot irradiated nuclear fuel in the storage pools will begin to boil off the cooling water. Within a day or two, the pool’s water could completely boil away.