Archive for Birds

You cannot tell birds what they cannot do!

Posted in 2014, animals with tags , on December 30, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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The hummingbird migrates 3,500 miles away and live five times longer than thought

Posted in 2014, animals with tags , , , on November 10, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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>Ornithologists in the US say hummingbirds can live longer than 10 years

They have been tagging the birds for a decade to study their habits

Experiment has revealed that one bird flew 3,500 miles (5,630km) for winter

Hummingbirds have been found wintering in relatively cool areas below 18°C

Thousands of birds have been ‘banded’ and experts hope to learn about whether they migrate in one go, or stop off along the way

HOVERING HUMMINGBIRDS

Hummingbirds are the only birds to hover in the air by relying on their strength alone.

In August, scientists found that it is the ratio of the bird’s wing length to its width that makes them so efficient.

The discovery is helping experts compete with 42 million years of natural selection to build helicopters that are increasingly efficient, which could match the performance of the best hummingbird.

David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University in California, tested wings from 12 different species of hummingbirds, which he sourced from museums.

He positioned them on a machine used to test the aerodynamics of helicopter blades – so they spun around like man-made blades.

Together with his team, he used cameras to capture airflow around the wings and measured the drag and the lift force they exerted at different speeds and angles.

Professor Lentink’s team used the same machine to test the rotor blades from a ProxDynamics Black Hornet autonomous micro helicopter, which is one of the most efficient on the market and is used by the UK’s army in Afghanistan.

They found that the micro-helicopter’s blades are as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird.

But while the micro-copter’s blades kept pace with the middle-of-the-pack hummingbird wings, they could not keep up with the most efficient hummingbird’s wing.

The wings of Anna’s hummingbird – a species common throughout the West Coast of the U.S. – were found to be about 27 per cent more efficient than the man-made micro-copter blades.

 

Smart Birds Open Doors & Bird feeds Cat and Dog!

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , on May 31, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

 

Birds nesting in an underground parkade could have been locked in when the parkade was converted to a campus bike centre with doors on the end. The swallows quickly learned how to trigger the motion detectors to open the doors and go in and out whenever they want. Smart birds!

”Cha Cha” (Australian White-winged Chough), not Crow, feeding ”Kitten” (tail-less Manx cat) & ”Skye” (cross Whippet/Jack Russell)….. All my pets are rescued from death-row, dumped, or injured off roads. ”Skye” is a timid dog, because of former abuse, who at time of video-ing was getting sick of Cha Cha annoying her & tryng to feed her all day. (this is only 3 of them by the way).. Cha Cha, being a Chough, will naturally try to feed everyone and everything. It is in their blueprint as a ‘family’ bird.

The EDGE Birds list : Some of the World’s 100 most unique and endangered birds are revealed in this new list

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , , , , on April 11, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Below we have highlighted ten of the most unique and threatened EDGE Birds (number indicates EDGE rank):

1. Giant ibis (Thaumatibis gigantea) – occupying the top spot on the EDGE birds list this striking bird is the world’s largest ibis. It is the national bird of Cambodia and, owing to its rarity and exceptional size, holds near-mythical status for bird-watchers, naturalists and conservationists.


4. Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus) – the world’s heaviest parrot, the New Zealand kakapo is also unusual in being nocturnal and flightless. The male kakapo produces a loud ‘boom’ call to attract potential mates which can be heard up to 5 kilometres away.


8. Philippine eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) – one of the largest and rarest eagles on the planet, this incredible predator was formerly thought to prey exclusively on monkeys. It is now known to prey on a variety of animals ranging from rodents and bats to pigs and monitor lizards.


11. Spoon-billed sandpiper (Eurynorhynchus pygmeus) – this small wading bird has a unique spatula-shaped bill.  Every year the birds undertake an incredible 8,000 km journey from their breeding grounds in northeast Russia to their main wintering grounds in Bangladesh and Myanmar.


12. Northern bald ibis (Geronticus eremita) – once widespread across Northern Africa and Europe, this distinctive, red-faced bird has declined to just 200 breeding wild adults. There are more than 2,000 individuals in captivity, including a population at ZSL London Zoo.


28. Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) – so-called because it supposedly resembles an old-fashioned secretary carrying quill-pens tucked behind his ears, this unmistakable African bird has an incredible method of stalking its prey, which it often stamps on before swallowing whole.

 

34. Tooth-billed pigeon (Didunculus strigirostris) – also known as the ‘little dodo’ this archaic, pigeon-like bird is found only on the island of Samoa. With fewer than 250 adults estimated to survive, urgent action is needed to save the species from the fate of its infamous relative, the dodo.


42. Lesser florican (Sypheotides indicus) – this iconic black and white florican is best known for the male’s elaborate aerial courtship displays in which the male leaps vertically in the air in a flurry of wings and legs to attract a mate.

 

56. Juan Fernandez firecrown (Sephanoides fernandensis) – this beautiful, fiery hummingbird is found on only one island off the coast of Chile. During territorial disputes, the firecrown will hover in front of the intruder and flash its crown of stunning, iridescent plumage.

 

73. Greater adjutant (Leptoptilos dubius) – this enormous prehistoric-looking stork grows to 1.5 m high with a wingspan of 2.5m. The name ‘adjutant’ actually refers to a military rank – it was given to this bird on account of its stiff, marching walk.

Discover the top 100 EDGE Bird list here

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/birds/top_100.php

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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Discover the top 100 EDGE Bird list here

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/birds/top_100.php

Shagged by a rare parrot – Stephen Fry and zoologist Mark Carwardine head to the ends of the earth in search of animals on the edge of extinction.

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , , on March 18, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/lastchancetosee

Stephen Fry and zoologist Mark Carwardine head to the ends of the earth in search of animals on the edge of extinction.

In New Zealand the travellers make their way through one of the most dramatic landscapes in the world. They are on a journey to find the last remaining kakapo, a fat, flightless parrot which, when threatened with attack, adopts a strategy of standing very still indeed.

The internet is abuzz with the long-shot success story of Lisa One, a kakapo parrot chick whose life was saved by New Zealand conservationists after her mother Lisa accidentally crushed her egg.

The pictures show just how delicate and unbelievable the conservationists’ task was – senior kakapo ranger Jo Ledington had to tape the shell of a partially crushed kakapo egg back together and allow the chick within to mature and hatch naturally. They succeeded by using, of all thing, masking tape.

Why was Lisa One’s successful birth so important? Because of how rare the kakapo is – only 125 of the birds exist. Their population was devastated when rats and cats were introduced to New Zealand by European settlers. Before these animals were introduced, the flightless kakapo’s only natural predator was the eagle.

Preserving the kakapo is important not just to maintain New Zealand’s biodiversity, but because they’re truly extraordinary birds. Not only are they the world’s heaviest parrot at 2-4kg, they are also possibly the longest-lived bird in the world, with a life expectancy of 95 years – and some have even lived to 120.

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Ranger Repairs Extremely Rare Parrot’s Crushed Egg With Glue And Tape

http://www.boredpanda.com/crushed-egg-repair-kakapo-parrot-lisa-one/

Amazing footage of how falcons catch their prey.

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , on January 18, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

Amazing footage of falcons hunting crows.
Suzanne Amador Kane, working with falconers across the globe, has discovered that falcons pursue prey by keeping the image of the prey in the same place on their retina during the pursuit as they close in.This movie shows ground breaking footage capture by movie cameras mounted on hunting falcons filmed by Eddy De Mol and his colleagues Valerie Collet and Francois Lorrain.

The US Administration will let some wind companies kill or injure eagles to boost green energy

Posted in 2013 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 8, 2013 by theboldcorsicanflame

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(The Bald Eagle is the national bird of the United States of America….They are barely recovering from extinction that they are threatened again…What a symbol)

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The Obama administration said on Friday it will allow some companies to kill or injure bald and golden eagles for up to 30 years without penalty, in an effort to spur development and investment in green energy while balancing its environmental consequences. The change, requested by the wind energy industry, will provide legal protection for the lifespan of wind farms and other projects for which companies obtain a permit and make efforts to avoid killing the birds.

An investigation by the Associated Press earlier this year documented the illegal killing of eagles around wind farms, the Obama administration’s reluctance to prosecute such cases and its willingness to help keep the scope of the eagle deaths secret. The White House has championed wind power, a pollution-free energy intended to ease global warming, as a cornerstone of President Barack Obama’s energy plan.

In other areas, such as the government’s support for corn-based ethanol to reduce US dependence on gasoline, the White House has allowed the green industry to do not-so-green things. Another AP investigation recently showed that ethanol has proven far more damaging to the environment than politicians promised and much worse than the government admits today.

Wind Energy Eagle Deaths

FULL ARTICLE ON THEIR WEBSITE

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/06/obama-administration-will-let-some-wind-companies-kill-or-injure-eagles

 

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