Archive for Birds

25 Million Birds Are Illegally Killed in the Mediterranean Every Year

Posted in 2016, animals with tags , , on March 13, 2016 by theboldcorsicanflame

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A European turtledove, whose numbers are plummeting across the Mediterranean. (Photo: Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images)

Researchers find that the animals are being shot and trapped for food and the pet trade, with the majority of the deaths occurring at just 20 sites.

A new study finds that an estimated 25 million migrating birds are killed as they fly over Mediterranean countries each year. The deaths—by gun, net, or glue-covered traps—include several threatened species. Most of the birds end up being eaten as delicacies. Some are shot for sport, while others are captured alive and sold in the caged-bird trade.

To Be Continued on

http://www.takepart.com/article/2016/03/10/25-million-birds-are-illegally-killed-mediterranean-every-year

New research shows that the very same physical mechanisms are at play when a Bird sings and a Human speak

Posted in 2015, animals with tags , , , on December 1, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

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 When birds and humans sing it sounds completely different, but now new research reported in the journalNature Communications shows that the very same physical mechanisms are at play when a bird sings and a human speaks.

Birds and humans look different, sound different and evolved completely different organs for voice production. But now new research published in Nature Communications reveals that humans and birds use the exact same physical mechanism to make their vocal cords move and thus produce sound.

“Science has known for over 60 years that this mechanism – called the myoelastic-aerodynamic theory, or in short the MEAD mechanism- drives speech and singing in humans. We have now shown that birds use the exact same mechanism to make vocalizations. MEAD might even turn out to be a widespread mechanism in all land-dwelling vertebrates”, says lead author of the paper, Associate Professor Dr. Coen Elemans, Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark. Co-authors of the paper are from Emory University, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and Palacky University.

Over the last year Dr. Elemans and his colleagues studied six different species of bird from five avian groups. The smallest species, the zebra finch, weighs just 15 grams, and the largest one, the ostrich, weighs in at 200 kg. All studied birds were revealed to use the MEAD mechanism, just as humans do.

In the human voice box, or larynx, air from the lungs is pushed past the vocal cords, which then start moving back and forth sideways like a flag fluttering in the wind. With each oscillation the larynx closes and opens, making the airflow stop and start, which creates sound pulses. “Such vocal fold oscillations occur from about 100 times/sec in normal speech to one of the highest possible notes sung in opera at about 1400 times/sec, a F6 in Mozart’s “Die Zauberflöte”, adds voice expert and co-author Dr. Jan Švec of Palacky University in the Czech Republic.
To be Continued on

http://www.sott.net/article/307445-Birds-and-humans-Same-physical-mechanism-for-singing-talking

 

That’s what it looks like when Birds get prepared!

Posted in 2015, animals with tags , , , on May 8, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

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You cannot tell birds what they cannot do!

Posted in 2014, animals with tags , on December 30, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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The hummingbird migrates 3,500 miles away and live five times longer than thought

Posted in 2014, animals with tags , , , on November 10, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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>Ornithologists in the US say hummingbirds can live longer than 10 years

They have been tagging the birds for a decade to study their habits

Experiment has revealed that one bird flew 3,500 miles (5,630km) for winter

Hummingbirds have been found wintering in relatively cool areas below 18°C

Thousands of birds have been ‘banded’ and experts hope to learn about whether they migrate in one go, or stop off along the way

HOVERING HUMMINGBIRDS

Hummingbirds are the only birds to hover in the air by relying on their strength alone.

In August, scientists found that it is the ratio of the bird’s wing length to its width that makes them so efficient.

The discovery is helping experts compete with 42 million years of natural selection to build helicopters that are increasingly efficient, which could match the performance of the best hummingbird.

David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University in California, tested wings from 12 different species of hummingbirds, which he sourced from museums.

He positioned them on a machine used to test the aerodynamics of helicopter blades – so they spun around like man-made blades.

Together with his team, he used cameras to capture airflow around the wings and measured the drag and the lift force they exerted at different speeds and angles.

Professor Lentink’s team used the same machine to test the rotor blades from a ProxDynamics Black Hornet autonomous micro helicopter, which is one of the most efficient on the market and is used by the UK’s army in Afghanistan.

They found that the micro-helicopter’s blades are as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird.

But while the micro-copter’s blades kept pace with the middle-of-the-pack hummingbird wings, they could not keep up with the most efficient hummingbird’s wing.

The wings of Anna’s hummingbird – a species common throughout the West Coast of the U.S. – were found to be about 27 per cent more efficient than the man-made micro-copter blades.

 

Smart Birds Open Doors & Bird feeds Cat and Dog!

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , on May 31, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

 

Birds nesting in an underground parkade could have been locked in when the parkade was converted to a campus bike centre with doors on the end. The swallows quickly learned how to trigger the motion detectors to open the doors and go in and out whenever they want. Smart birds!

”Cha Cha” (Australian White-winged Chough), not Crow, feeding ”Kitten” (tail-less Manx cat) & ”Skye” (cross Whippet/Jack Russell)….. All my pets are rescued from death-row, dumped, or injured off roads. ”Skye” is a timid dog, because of former abuse, who at time of video-ing was getting sick of Cha Cha annoying her & tryng to feed her all day. (this is only 3 of them by the way).. Cha Cha, being a Chough, will naturally try to feed everyone and everything. It is in their blueprint as a ‘family’ bird.

The EDGE Birds list : Some of the World’s 100 most unique and endangered birds are revealed in this new list

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , , , , on April 11, 2014 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Below we have highlighted ten of the most unique and threatened EDGE Birds (number indicates EDGE rank):

1. Giant ibis (Thaumatibis gigantea) – occupying the top spot on the EDGE birds list this striking bird is the world’s largest ibis. It is the national bird of Cambodia and, owing to its rarity and exceptional size, holds near-mythical status for bird-watchers, naturalists and conservationists.


4. Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus) – the world’s heaviest parrot, the New Zealand kakapo is also unusual in being nocturnal and flightless. The male kakapo produces a loud ‘boom’ call to attract potential mates which can be heard up to 5 kilometres away.


8. Philippine eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) – one of the largest and rarest eagles on the planet, this incredible predator was formerly thought to prey exclusively on monkeys. It is now known to prey on a variety of animals ranging from rodents and bats to pigs and monitor lizards.


11. Spoon-billed sandpiper (Eurynorhynchus pygmeus) – this small wading bird has a unique spatula-shaped bill.  Every year the birds undertake an incredible 8,000 km journey from their breeding grounds in northeast Russia to their main wintering grounds in Bangladesh and Myanmar.


12. Northern bald ibis (Geronticus eremita) – once widespread across Northern Africa and Europe, this distinctive, red-faced bird has declined to just 200 breeding wild adults. There are more than 2,000 individuals in captivity, including a population at ZSL London Zoo.


28. Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) – so-called because it supposedly resembles an old-fashioned secretary carrying quill-pens tucked behind his ears, this unmistakable African bird has an incredible method of stalking its prey, which it often stamps on before swallowing whole.

 

34. Tooth-billed pigeon (Didunculus strigirostris) – also known as the ‘little dodo’ this archaic, pigeon-like bird is found only on the island of Samoa. With fewer than 250 adults estimated to survive, urgent action is needed to save the species from the fate of its infamous relative, the dodo.


42. Lesser florican (Sypheotides indicus) – this iconic black and white florican is best known for the male’s elaborate aerial courtship displays in which the male leaps vertically in the air in a flurry of wings and legs to attract a mate.

 

56. Juan Fernandez firecrown (Sephanoides fernandensis) – this beautiful, fiery hummingbird is found on only one island off the coast of Chile. During territorial disputes, the firecrown will hover in front of the intruder and flash its crown of stunning, iridescent plumage.

 

73. Greater adjutant (Leptoptilos dubius) – this enormous prehistoric-looking stork grows to 1.5 m high with a wingspan of 2.5m. The name ‘adjutant’ actually refers to a military rank – it was given to this bird on account of its stiff, marching walk.

Discover the top 100 EDGE Bird list here

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/birds/top_100.php

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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http://www.edgeofexistence.org/index.php

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Discover the top 100 EDGE Bird list here

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/birds/top_100.php

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