Archive for the Galaxy Category

On the evening of Nov. 16th, Artic Meteor Turns Night into Day

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy, Uncategorized with tags , on November 17, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

Aurora tour guide Tony Bateman of northern Finland was indoors, warming up between auroras, when his surroundings began to vibrate.

“There was a huge bang and the cottage shook violently,” he reports. “At first I thought it was an earthquake.

Or maybe a tree fell on the cottage roof! I walked outside and inspected the trees. Everything looked okay.” A quick replay of his aurora webcam solved the mystery. “It was an incredible meteor,” he says.

To be continued on

http://spaceweather.com/

Moonbow Under The Aurora Borealis

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , on November 16, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Surely, a show that will remain in my memory, a week ago, on November 7th. Between fast moving clouds, rain showers which lasted no more than two or three minutes, this fantastic moonbow appeared, when the almost Full Moon managed to break the clouds….(..)

To be continued on:

http://spaceweather.com

Northern Lights Invade the USA – auroras spilled across the Canadian border into more than a dozen US states

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , on November 8, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Space weather forecasters predicted a minor geomagnetic storm on Nov. 7th.

It turned out to be much stronger. As night fell across North America, auroras spilled across the Canadian border into more than a dozen US states.

Jack Webb photographed these red columns towering over Wapiti, Wyoming.

“At this latitude (+44 N) it takes a pretty good geomagnetic storm to get above it.”

Auroras were sighted in Alaska,Vermont, New York, Wyoming, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois and–believe it or not–Nebraska!!!!

More Photos on

http://spaceweather.com 

On the night of Oct. 26th, sky watchers in Japan witnessed a fireball tearing through the belt of Orion

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , on November 3, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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A METEOR MELTS AWAY: On the night of Oct. 26th, sky watchers in Japan witnessed a fireball tearing through the belt of Orion. “It was yellow and very bright,” reports Yasushi Aoshima, who captured the dramatic disintegration in a series of rapid-fire photos.

To be Continued on:

http://spaceweather.com/

Close encounter between the Sun and Comet 96P/Machholz

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy, Uncategorized with tags , , on October 26, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

 

Today, spacecraft are monitoring a close encounter between the sun and Comet 96P/Machholz.

This is no ordinary comet. 96P/Machholz has a strange chemical composition that has prompted astronomers to wonder if it comes from another star system.

Moreover, it is linked to a complicated network of debris streams criss-crossing the Solar System, suggesting that 96P/Machholz may have exploded in the distant past.

The comet will receive a new blast of heat in the days ahead as it swoops past the sun deep inside the orbit of Mercury.

Will it fragment further? Visit Spaceweather.com to see the latest images.

Above: The orbiting Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is monitoring the comet’s approach to the sun.  SOHO uses a coronagraph–that is, an opaque disk to block solar glare–to see comets and planets otherwise invisible to the human eye.

Spotless Sun Sparks Bright Auroras

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , on October 16, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Above: On Oct. 12, 2017, the sky above Tromsø, Norway, exploded in a spray of geomagnetic light. Colin Palmer photographed these bright green auroras from the island of Kvaloya. More images may be found in the Realtime Aurora Photo Gallery.

The sun is sliding into a deep Solar Minimum that continues to defy some expectations. For much of the past week, the sun was absolutely blank–no sunspots–and solar activity was deemed “very low.”

Nevertheless, space weather was stormy. From Oct. 11th through 15th, not a single day went by without a geomagnetic storm. Bright auroras were sighted not only around the poles, but also in a number of US states.

The reason for these counterintuitive space storms is explained on today’s edition of Spaceweather.com–along with expectations for more in the days ahead.

 

Strange Rainbow

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags on October 9, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Jon Larsen was driving home east of Spearfish, South Dakota, last Friday morning when he saw a rainbow.

“There was something wrong with it,” he says.  “I grabbed my camera and zoomed in for a closer look.”  This is what he saw.

The rainbow’s primary red band had separated from the rest!” says Larsen.

What happened? Atmospheric optics expert Les Cowley says there are at least two ways that rainbows can be distorted in this way:

First, by hot air: “This rainbow over Adelaide, Australia, was bent by columns of rising hot city air, but no cities appear to be near Jon Larsen’s rainbow,” says Cowley.

Second, by mixed-up raindrops: “Rainbows can appear distorted when there are differences in the size of the raindrops along lines of sight to different parts of the bow. Small drops give broader bows.”

The second explanation is probably correct. Larsen notes that “strong surface winds were blowing rain shafts around.” These strong winds may have segregated raindrops into layers of different size–small drops being blown about more easily than large ones–giving the ‘bow a strange appearance, indeed.

spaceweather.com

 

 

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