Archive for the astronomy Category

On the evening of Nov. 16th, Artic Meteor Turns Night into Day

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy, Uncategorized with tags , on November 17, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

Aurora tour guide Tony Bateman of northern Finland was indoors, warming up between auroras, when his surroundings began to vibrate.

“There was a huge bang and the cottage shook violently,” he reports. “At first I thought it was an earthquake.

Or maybe a tree fell on the cottage roof! I walked outside and inspected the trees. Everything looked okay.” A quick replay of his aurora webcam solved the mystery. “It was an incredible meteor,” he says.

To be continued on

http://spaceweather.com/

Moonbow Under The Aurora Borealis

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , on November 16, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Surely, a show that will remain in my memory, a week ago, on November 7th. Between fast moving clouds, rain showers which lasted no more than two or three minutes, this fantastic moonbow appeared, when the almost Full Moon managed to break the clouds….(..)

To be continued on:

http://spaceweather.com

Northern Lights Invade the USA – auroras spilled across the Canadian border into more than a dozen US states

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , on November 8, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Space weather forecasters predicted a minor geomagnetic storm on Nov. 7th.

It turned out to be much stronger. As night fell across North America, auroras spilled across the Canadian border into more than a dozen US states.

Jack Webb photographed these red columns towering over Wapiti, Wyoming.

“At this latitude (+44 N) it takes a pretty good geomagnetic storm to get above it.”

Auroras were sighted in Alaska,Vermont, New York, Wyoming, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois and–believe it or not–Nebraska!!!!

More Photos on

http://spaceweather.com 

On Nov. 7th, a fast-moving stream of solar wind is expected to engulf our planet

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Uncategorized with tags on November 6, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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GEOMAGNETIC STORM PREDICTED:

On Nov. 6th, Earth will cross through a fold in the “heliospheric current sheet”–a vast system of electrical currents that ripples through interplanetary space.

A day later, on Nov. 7th, a fast-moving stream of solar wind is expected to engulf our planet. The combined effect of these two events could spark polar geomagnetic storms.

NOAA forecasters say there is a chance of G1-class storms on both Nov. 7th and Nov. 8th. Arctic sky watchers will likely see auroras mixed with moonlight on those dates, while photographers in northern-tier US states may be able to capture the lights using digital cameras with nighttime ISO settings.

Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and updates.

 

On the night of Oct. 26th, sky watchers in Japan witnessed a fireball tearing through the belt of Orion

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , on November 3, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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A METEOR MELTS AWAY: On the night of Oct. 26th, sky watchers in Japan witnessed a fireball tearing through the belt of Orion. “It was yellow and very bright,” reports Yasushi Aoshima, who captured the dramatic disintegration in a series of rapid-fire photos.

To be Continued on:

http://spaceweather.com/

Close encounter between the Sun and Comet 96P/Machholz

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy, Uncategorized with tags , , on October 26, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

 

Today, spacecraft are monitoring a close encounter between the sun and Comet 96P/Machholz.

This is no ordinary comet. 96P/Machholz has a strange chemical composition that has prompted astronomers to wonder if it comes from another star system.

Moreover, it is linked to a complicated network of debris streams criss-crossing the Solar System, suggesting that 96P/Machholz may have exploded in the distant past.

The comet will receive a new blast of heat in the days ahead as it swoops past the sun deep inside the orbit of Mercury.

Will it fragment further? Visit Spaceweather.com to see the latest images.

Above: The orbiting Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is monitoring the comet’s approach to the sun.  SOHO uses a coronagraph–that is, an opaque disk to block solar glare–to see comets and planets otherwise invisible to the human eye.

For the first time ever, astrophysicists have discovered gravitational waves originating from an entirely new source: merging neutron stars.

Posted in 2017, astronomy with tags , on October 17, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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For the first time, gravitational waves have been detected coming from the violent collision of two neutron star potentially solving the mystery of where heavy elements like gold come from as well as producing a visible afterglow detected by over 70 telescopes around the world.

To Be Continued on:

https://astronomynow.com/2017/10/16/gravitational-waves-from-colliding-neutron-stars-usher-in-new-era-of-astronomy/

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