Archive for March, 2017

April 1ST Comet Flyby: No kidding. Green comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak is flying over Earth’s North Pole

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on March 31, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Amateur astronomer Yasushi Aoshima sends this picture of the approaching comet from Fukushima, Japan

Green comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak is flying over Earth’s North Pole this week where sky watchers can find it all night long not far from the bowl of the Big Dipper. At closest approach on April 1st it will be just 21 million km from Earth–an easy target for backyard telescopes and almost visible to the naked eye.

Amateur astronomer Yasushi Aoshima sends this picture of the approaching comet from Fukushima, Japan

“On March 22nd I caught 41P ‘eating’ M108, the Surfboard Galaxy,” says Aoshima. “The comet’s green atmosphere appeared to swallow the distant spiral galaxy as it exited Ursa Major.”

Why green? Like many comets, 41P has a verdant hue because its atmosphere contains diatomic carbon (C2)–a substance that glows green in the near vacuum of space.

Comet 41P is not only approaching Earth, but also the sun. April 12th is the date of perihelion (minimum distance from the sun). This means we are catching the comet just as solar heating is furiously searing its icy core. The green atmosphere should be well puffed up by streamers of vaporizing gas. Optimistic estimates of the comet’s brightness place it at magnitude +6, near the lower limit of naked-eye visibility.

This is not a Great Comet, but it should be a good one. The best time to observe is during the dark hours before sunrise when the green fuzzball is high in the northern sky. If you have a GOTO telescope, you can point it using an ephemeris from the Minor Planet Center. These sky maps show approximately where to look: March 31, April 1, 2.

Nasa Earth Observatory: Polar Sea Ice at Record Lows : Image of the Day

Posted in 2017, Extreme Weather, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on March 29, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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In March 2017, Arctic sea ice reached a record-low maximum extent, according to scientists at NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). In the same month, sea ice on the opposite side of the planet, around Antarctica, hit its lowest extent ever recorded at the end of the austral summer—a surprising turn of events after years of moderate sea ice expansion.

On February 13, 2017, the combined Arctic and Antarctic sea ice numbers were at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979. Total polar sea ice covered 16.21 million square kilometers (6.26 million square miles), which is 2 million square kilometers (790,000 square miles) less than the average global minimum extent for 1981–2010. That’s the equivalent to losing a chunk of sea ice larger than Mexico.

The line graphs above plot the monthly deviations and overall trends in polar sea ice from 1979 to 2017 as measured by satellites. The top line shows the Arctic; the middle shows Antarctica; and the third shows the global, combined total. The graphs depict how much the sea ice concentration moved above or below the long-term average. (They do not plot total sea ice concentration.)

Arctic and global sea ice totals have moved consistently downward over 38 years. Antarctic trends are more muddled, but they do not offset the great losses in the Arctic. The maps below give a closer look at the record lows that occurred at each pole this year.

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MORE OF THE ARTICLE TO BE CONTINUED ON

Source: Polar Sea Ice at Record Lows : Image of the Day

Volcano spews huge ash clouds in Russian Kamchatka in surprise eruption after 250 years of silence

Posted in 2017 with tags , on March 29, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

 

Published on Mar 25, 2017

The Kambalny volcano, located in the Yuzhno-Kamchatsky wildlife preserve in Kamchatka, showed activity on Saturday after first rumbling a day earlier, for the first time in around 250 years.

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A large canyon-shaped hole in the sun’s atmosphere is facing Earth and spewing a stream of solar wind toward our planet

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on March 25, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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GEOMAGNETIC STORM WATCH:

A large canyon-shaped hole in the sun’s atmosphere is facing Earth and spewing a stream of solar wind toward our planet.

Estimated time of arrival: 2 to 3 days from now. This has prompted NOAA forecasters to issue a geomagnetic storm watch for March 28th when storm levels could reach category G2–that is, moderately strong.

Auroras could descend from the Arctic Circle to northern-tier US states from New York to Wisconsin to Washington. Visit Spaceweather.com to learn more about the incoming solar wind stream and what makes it so potent.

San Diego brewery makes beer with SEWAGE water 

Posted in 2017, food with tags , , , , on March 24, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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Toilet to tap: California brewery makes beer with treated SEWAGE water… and curious customers describe the taste as ‘outstanding’

A Southern California brewery has successfully tested a beer using treated sewage water.

Stone Brewing, a large craft brewing operation headquartered in Escondido, presented its Full Circle Pale Ale to curious customers at an event Thursday in San Diego.

The new ale is made using recycled, treated sewage water and is part of San Diego’s plan, ‘Pure Water San Diego,’ to get a third of its water from recycled sources by 2021.

And the verdict for the brew, which some have dubbed ‘toilet to tap,’ seemed to be quite positive, SF Gate reported.

San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer told the Times that the brew was ‘fantastic’ and added: ‘There’s no better way to highlight the purity of this water.’

Other patrons said the brew was ‘outstanding’ and ‘delicious.’

Source: San Diego brewery makes beer with SEWAGE water | Daily Mail Online

Massive ocean DIE OFF foreshadows the era of global human population collapse

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 24, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

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The oceans of Earth have been home to countless creatures over the course of the planet’s lifetime. But the once-friendly bodies of water that stretch between continents have grown inhospitable for many of its former residents, and as such, an unprecedented amount of ocean life die-off is occurring.

The destruction of Earth’s oceans and the marine life that inhabits them is nothing short of devastating, and if the human race is not careful, we too may live to see our species’ light go out, so to speak. Indeed, a collapse of magnificent proportions could be on the horizon.

Dead ocean zones have been growing at a concerning pace for years. In 2015, dead zones reportedly accounted for 10 percent of the world’s ocean area, and that number is constantly on the rise.

Dead zones in the ocean refer to areas where the oxygen levels in the water have grown too depleted to support life. Agrochemical and fertilizer run-off, overfishing and the seeping of toxic heavy metals and radioactive material into the oceans all play a substantial role in the growth and proliferation of dead ocean zones.

In 2008, nearly the entire east and south coasts of the United States were littered with dead zones. And as Scientific American reports, in 2008, there were 405 known ocean dead zones worldwide — up from just 49 in the 1960s.

Sea floors have reportedly taken about 1,000 years to recover from past eras of low oxygen, and only a few dead zones are known to have had quick rebounds from the devastation it brings. The Black Sea, for instance, sprung back to life quite quickly after the collapse of the Soviet Union — which came with a substantial reduction in fertilizer run-off.

Fertilizer run-off is a significant problem in ocean waters. The chemicals may not be helping crops grow faster, but they do feed massive algae blooms on the water’s surface. As the blooms die and sink to the ocean floor, they are feasted upon by microbes — which take up oxygen in the process. And the more algae there is, the more oxygen is being taken up by microbes. In turn, this reduces the amount of oxygen available to other species. This results in the fleeing of fish, crustaceans and other mobile sea creatures. Those that are immobile, such as clams, are sadly left to succumb to the oxygen-deprived waters.

TO BE CONTINUED ON THEIR WEBSITE

Source: Massive ocean DIE OFF foreshadows the era of global human population collapse

Hero cat pounds on door; saves family from carbon monoxide poisoning — Fellowship of the Minds

Posted in 2017, animals with tags , , , , , , on March 24, 2017 by theboldcorsicanflame

Carbon monoxide kills.

Every year, on average, 430 Americans die from carbon monoxide poisoning, according to the CDC. Although you can’t see or smell carbon monoxide, a Maine Coon cat named Gracie in Wisconsin somehow knew, and saved her human family from carbon monoxide poisoning by pounding on their bedroom door, thereby, waking up the […]

via Hero cat pounds on door; saves family from carbon monoxide poisoning — Fellowship of the Minds

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