A Hundred Million Stars in 3 Minutes

In January 2015, NASA released the largest image ever of the Andromeda galaxy, taken by the Hubble telescope. Totaling 1.5 billion pixels and requiring 4.3 gigabytes of disk space, this photo provides a detailed glimpse at the sheer scale of our nearest galactic neighbor. By zooming into the incredible shot, filmmaker Dave Achtemichuk creates an unforgettable interactive experience.

See more from the filmmaker.
https://www.youtube.com/c/daveachuk

The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s mission of inspiring people to care about the planet. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of the National Geographic Society.

One Response to “A Hundred Million Stars in 3 Minutes”

  1. Reblogged this on The Last Wave: A NDE and commented:
    Wow! This video will literally expand horizons. It had such an impact on me that I actually feel better after watching it than I did before I was fortunate to go on this trip. Maybe it’s because when I had the NDE, I went to space and it was so grandiose that it was startling. That’s the feeling I received when watching this well-made video of our intergalactic, ‘spaceship Mother Earth’ (R. Buckminster Fuller, Jr.), in relation with all that is out there…

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