Venus and Jupiter will be visible near each other in skies around the world tomorrow and Wednesday in a rare conjunction event

Posted in 2015, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , on June 29, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

venus_jupiter_june_2015

The planets Jupiter and Venus will appear 22 minutes of arc apart, which is a measurement used in astronomy to track the size and positions of objects in the night sky.

For comparison, the full moon is 30 minutes of arc across.

A small telescope or a pair of binoculars will easily resolve the two planets, and show them in the same field of view.

Venus is now just over 56 million miles (90 million km) from Earth and Jupiter about 10 times further at 560 million miles (900 million km).

But Jupiter is also 11.8 times bigger than Venus, which means that the two planets will appear as a similar size.

Venus Jupiter graphic.jpg

Venus Jupiter graphic.jpg

Stunning Photo of a Rainbow meeting a Wave by Sammy Garcia

Posted in 2015 with tags , , on June 28, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

rainbow_wave

 

Rainbow wave shot with GoPro mounted on a http://www.knektusa.com/ fps pole #gopro

Photo by : Sammy Garcia Photo

http://www.santacruzwaves.com/

 

The sun has unleashed 3 separate solar storms that have combined to smash into Earth’s atmosphere

Posted in 2015, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , , , , , on June 24, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Forecasters say the storm will continue tonight, causing the huge aurora to be visible from the Earth’s north. It should be seen in much of Europe, as long as there are no clouds, and may even be visible as far south as the Canadian border with the US.

But the phenomenon could cause problems with electricity supplies here.

The US Government’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWCP) said: ‘Aurora watchers in North America, especially northern states of the US, should stay alert.  

‘The geomagnetic storm that began on 22 June has reached G4 (Severe) levels once again as of 0513 UTC (0113 EDT) on 23 June. 

‘Solar wind conditions remain highly favourable for continued Strong Geomagnetic storming, with both fast solar wind and strong magnetic fields.’ 

‘This is the very early stages of an event that will play out over many hours, with SWPC forecasting continuing storm level intensities into tomorrow. 

June 22nd 2015 Full Halo CME, Storm Warning: A coronal mass ejection (CME) is heading directly for Earth

Posted in 2015, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , , on June 22, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

fullhalo2

 

It left the sun during the early hours of June 21st, and is expected to sweep up one or two lesser CMEs already en route, before it reaches Earth sometime on June 22nd. Click to view a movie of the “full-halo” CME

NOAA forecasters estimate a 90% chance of polar geomagnetic storms when the CME arrives. This doesn’t mean that a major space weather event is in the offing. The storm could be mild. It all depends on how the magnetic field of the CME connects to the magnetic field of Earth at the time of impact. According to NOAA, there’s only a 10% chance of nothing happening, so stay tuned. Aurora alerts: text, voice

http://spaceweather.com/

 

Some Dogs just don’t want to bath

Posted in 2015, animals with tags , , , on June 19, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

Deep in the ocean’s cold, dark waters lives a species of wide-eyed octopus that will surely warm your heart with pure cuteness

Posted in 2015, animals with tags , on June 18, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame

octopus

 

Up until now, these peculiar creatures have gone unnamed. Now, scientists are preparing to formally name the species, and they’re considering the one word that captures this tiny cephalopod’s essence: Opisthoteuthis adorabilis.

Naming Rights

Researchers have been collecting and studying these unidentified cephalopods since 1990, but no one undertook the exhaustive process to scientifically identify them. Scientists need to study newly discovered creatures — inside and out — to clearly describe how they are unique from other species that may be closely related. New species identifications, including a name, are then published as articles in scientific journals.

This species belongs to the Opistotheuthis genus, which includes octopus species that are notable for their compressed shape and stumpy, webbed limbs. The naming task in this case falls on Stephanie Bush, a researcher at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, who has been working hard to classify these aquatic animals.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2015/06/16/adorable-octopus-name/?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DSC_News_150618_Final&utm_content=#74686

Throughout the month of June 2015, the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, will be converging in the sunset sky.

Posted in 2015, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , , on June 14, 2015 by theboldcorsicanflame
Venus (right) and Jupiter (centre), on June 12, 2015, as they are converging toward a close conjunction on June 30, 2015. The star Regulus is at left, left of the windmill. Photographed from an old farm yard north of Vulcan, Alberta. This is an HDR-stack of 3 exposures to record detail in the ground and sky. Shot with the Canon 60Da and 16-35mm lens.

Venus (right) and Jupiter (centre), on June 12, 2015, as they are converging toward a close conjunction on June 30, 2015. The star Regulus is at left, left of the windmill. Photographed from an old farm yard north of Vulcan, Alberta. This is an HDR-stack of 3 exposures to record detail in the ground and sky. Shot with the Canon 60Da and 16-35mm lens.

If you love stargazing, there’s a date you should mark on your calendar: June. That’s right, the whole month. Throughout the month of June 2015, the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, will be converging in the sunset sky. Last night in Vulcan, Alberta, photographer Alan Dyer caught them lining up with 1st-magnitude star Regulus

“Venus and Jupiter were visible even through light clouds,” says Dyer. “It was a beautiful sight.”

The convergence will continue for the rest of the month. Every night you can see the two planets drawing closer together. By the end of June, Venus and Jupiter will be a jaw-dropping 1/3rd of a degree apart.  That’s less than the width of a full Moon.  You’ll be able to hide the pair behind the tip of your pinky finger held at arm’s length.

Observing tips: When the sun goes down, step outside and look west.  You don’t have to wait until the sky fades to black. Venus and Jupiter are so bright, you can see then shining through the twilight.  In fact, some people say the planets are especially beautiful when they are surrounded by the cobalt hue of the early evening sky. Browse the realtime photo gallery for daily sightings.

http://spaceweather.com/

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 449 other followers

%d bloggers like this: